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  1. 3 points
    repairman2be

    0-30V 0-3A Latest Data

    Hi all, Finally after some months have gone by, my build of the Power Supply is done. I have used liquibyte schematic Rev. 8 and had made the cirquit board according to the Gerber.zip file he posted here: 0-30V Stabilized Power Supply Page 88 posted October 6, 2014 "http://electronics-lab.com/community/index.php?/topic/29563-0-30v-stabilized-power-supply/&page=88" I left out D10 and R15 as per his description. I have plenty of boards leftover if someone has a need for it. There was only one mistake liquibyte made which have outlined in one of the pictures uploaded here. I was fortunate enough to get a big case with a Toroidal transformer from the scrapyard. Also many parts are recycled from various sources. Regards, William
  2. 3 points
    Guest

    0-30V 0-3A Latest Data

    Finally, my post with the Eagle .sch and .brd, full gerbers, and parts list for Digikey in a zip file. I'm also including many of the pics I took as I was building that were posted both before and after this post. I'm still not completely done and may add more pics later. One thing I have changed is the third transformer for the auxiliary circuitry for the temperature sensor and fans and the displays (I wanted a better transformer than the Radio Shack special I had on hand). Archive attached. 30V.zip
  3. 2 points
    So Finally which version of schematic is correct / flawless to build the PSU ?
  4. 2 points
    audioguru

    0-30 Vdc Stabilized Power Supply

    February 23 above on this page has the latest schematic of the revised 3A lab power supply.
  5. 2 points
    malique

    LM3914 pspice library

    Does anyone has LM3914 pspice library? i desperately need it..pleeeeease!
  6. 2 points
    Guest

    Low power solenoid?

    I want to apply force for an extended amount of time (10 secs to a couple minutes) using a solenoid actuator. Unfortunately, it seems that solenoids use a lot of power when they are active. Is there a solenoid type that will only use power when switching between active and not active? There's probably a way I can do this with an external mechanism, but I was wondering if there may be commercial solenoids that have this built-in. Thanks, Jessica
  7. 2 points
    Illegal content (ebook/magazines/software) will be deleted without any notice. Thanks
  8. 2 points
    tjolle62

    Overload Protector A16 ???

    In a few circuit diagrams i have they refer to a what seems to me is a transistor with B C E as a overload protector and with number A16 and i have looked for a few hours on the net and i can't find anything on this little fellow, Anyone knows what I'm looking for and wanna share that info Please .... Come on !! 48 visits !! some one must know what it is !!! PNP is it also...........
  9. 2 points
    tjolle62

    Overload Protector A16 ???

    At last i got a theori from a totally different place and he wasn't shure either but he had a weak memory that it could be 1A16 and a PNP transistor but after several deep searches on the I-net it didn't make any kind of senses whatsoever ???
  10. 2 points
    MP

    Car battery to parallel port

    When you use your resistive divider to drop the voltage down to 5 volts, you just need to select values of resistors to limit the current. This is basic ohm's law. V/R. Was this your question or did I misunderstand? I am not sure how you intend to monitor status by using one 5 volt pin. As an interface to the parallel port, you could use an LM3914. This would give you the resolution you need. There are also many other ways to proceed. You need to convert from analog to digital to read anything useful from the parallel port. MP
  11. 2 points
    Omni

    Car battery to parallel port

    Hi TJBraza, http://www.analog.com/UploadedFiles/Data_Sheets/ADT7485A.pdf Although, it will probably require a small program written in C or Visual basic to convert the string MSB & LSB into a more easier read etc... Take a moment and review the data sheet, the IC has a lot of potential.
  12. 2 points
    alanng96

    SL100 & SK100 transistor

    I can't find SL100 & SK100 transistor :'( Which transistors can replace these? Thank you for your help~ ;)
  13. 2 points
    Calm down people. It is not Mixos's fault, if it is against the law he has to remove the content. This site is very good for asking electronic related questions, I have yet to find a better one.
  14. 1 point
    Introduction ---------------- Hi Friends, I am back again with another Arduino based home automation project. This time I am trying to make my partner's life easy by installing a collision avoidance system in the garage to help her park the car safely without hitting the garage wall. So, in this video, I am going to use an ultrasonic sensor to calculate the car's distance from the garage wall and display it using green, yellow and red LEDs. The color of LEDs indicates whether to keep moving, slow down, stop or go back. The total cost of the project is around $20 - $25. Step 1: Logic The project has 3 phases Phase 1: Waiting for the car In this phase the device keeps looking for a moving object within the sensors proximity. If an object enters the proximity then one of the three LEDs turns on based on how far the moving object is. If the object is way too close, then a noise is made to make the moving object aware of the distance. Phase 2: No car in the garage If there is no object in the proximity then turn off all the LEDs. Phase 3: The car has stopped moving (Parked in the right spot) If the object has stopped moving and is still in the proximity wait for 20 CPU cycles and then turn off the LEDs. Step 2: Hardware Requirement For this very simple project we need: - A Perfboard - An Arduino nano/uno (whatever is handy) - A Red, Green and a Yellow LED (Light Emitting Diode) - 3 x 220ohm resistor for the LEDs - One HC-SRO4 Ultrasonic Sensor - A Buzzer shield or A buzzer and a 100 ohm resistor - A 220v AC to 5v DC Buck step-down module - One Female Pin Header Strip - An Ethernet cable - Some connecting cables - A USB cable to upload the code to the Arduino - and general soldering equipments Step 3: Assembly Let start by connecting the LEDs to the board. Connect the Red LED to pin D2, Yellow LED to D3 and the Green LED to D4 of the Arduino by putting in a 220ohm resistor between the Arduino board and the LEDs. Now lets connect the Buzzer to analogue pin A0. Next, connect the Trig pin of the Ultrasonic Sensor to D5 and the Echo pin to D6 of the Arduino. Once all the modules are connected to the Arduino board, its time for us to connect all the positive and negative pins together. Connect all the positive pins of the modules to the +5v supplied by the Buck Step-Down Module and the negative pins to the -ve terminal of the Module. That's it, we can now upload our sketch to the board. In this assembly I am using 3 LEDs to display the distance, however you can replace the 3 LEDs with a RGB LED, or you can also use an array of LEDs like an audio level indicator to display the movement of the car. Step 4: My Setup OK now lets see what I have made. I have installed the Arduino, buzzer, the ultrasonic sensor and the three 220 ohms resistors on one Perfboard. The 3 LEDs and the power module is installed on a second Perfboard. I will be covering the LEDs with a translucent cover to give it a nice look. The 220v power supply will be connected to the screw terminal block. The base unit will then be connected to the LEDs and the power supply with an Ethernet cable. Step 5: The Code int trigPin = PD5; // Sensor Trip pin connected to Arduino pin D5 int echoPin = PD6; // Sensor Echo pin connected to Arduino pin D6 int redLED = PD2; // Red LED connected to pin D2 int yellowLED = PD3; // Yellow LED connected to pin D3 int greenLED = PD4; // Green LED connected to pin D4 int buzzer = A0; // Buzzer connected to Analogue pin A0 long TempDistance = 0; // A variable to store the temporary distance int counter = 0; // Counter value to check if the object has stopped moving void setup() { Serial.begin(9600); pinMode(trigPin, OUTPUT); pinMode(echoPin, INPUT); pinMode(redLED, OUTPUT); pinMode(greenLED, OUTPUT); pinMode(yellowLED, OUTPUT); pinMode(buzzer, OUTPUT); } void loop() { long duration, Distance; digitalWrite(trigPin, LOW); delayMicroseconds(2); digitalWrite(trigPin, HIGH); delayMicroseconds(10); digitalWrite(trigPin, LOW); duration = pulseIn(echoPin, HIGH); Distance = (duration/2) / 74; // Distance in Inches if(counter < 20){ // Do the rest if the car is still moving if (Distance > 200) { // Nothing in the garrage turnThemAllOff(); } if ((Distance > 55) && (Distance <= 200)) { // Turn on Green LED digitalWrite(greenLED, HIGH); digitalWrite(yellowLED, LOW); digitalWrite(redLED, LOW); noTone(buzzer); } if ((Distance > 15) && (Distance <= 55)) { // Turn on Yellow LED digitalWrite(yellowLED, HIGH); digitalWrite(redLED, LOW); digitalWrite(greenLED,LOW); noTone(buzzer); } if (Distance <= 15) { // Turn on Red LED digitalWrite(redLED, HIGH); digitalWrite(greenLED,LOW); digitalWrite(yellowLED, LOW); noTone(buzzer); } if (Distance < 8) { // Item is way to close - start the buzzer tone(buzzer, 500); } } if ((Distance == TempDistance) || ((Distance+1) == TempDistance) || ((Distance-1) == TempDistance)){ if(counter >= 20){ // Turn off the lights if the object hasn't moved for 20 cycles (no change in distance) Serial.println("No movement detected, turning off the lights"); turnThemAllOff(); } else { counter++; } } else { counter = 0; // Reset counter if there is a movement } TempDistance = Distance; Serial.print(Distance); Serial.println(" inches"); Serial.print("Counter : "); Serial.println(counter); delay(500); } // Function to turn the LEDs off void turnThemAllOff(){ digitalWrite(redLED, LOW); digitalWrite(greenLED,LOW); digitalWrite(yellowLED, LOW); noTone(buzzer); } Start the code by defining the constants and the global variables that will be used throughout the code. Then define the pin modes in the setup section of the code. Then create a function to turn off all the LEDs and the buzzer. Now, calculate the "Distance" in inches by reading the values received from the Ultrasonic Sensor. Then by checking the value of the "Distance" we will turn on and off the LEDs based on how far the object is. If the distance is greater than 200 then turn off all the LEDs and the buzzer as the object is out of range. Else if it is between 55 and 200 then turn on the green LED. If the object is between 15 and 55 then turn on the yellow LED, and if the object goes closer than 15 inches then turn on the red LED until it reaches 8 inches. When the distance becomes less than 8 start the buzzer along with the red LED. Next bit of the code is to set the value of the counter based on the cars movement which then decides when to turn off the LEDs. It compares the value of "Distance" with the "TempDistance" and if the values are same (object hasn't moved) then increments the counter. If the object moves any-time during this process the counter is reset to 0. Finally the "TempDistance" is set to the value of "Distance". Just before comparing the Distances we also need to check if the counter value has exceed 20. I am doing this to stop the below code from executing if the car is in a steady position. Lastly we just need to add a small delay to our sketch to pause the code for a while. Step 6: Quick Demo So this is how I have installed the unit in my garage. As I walk close to the sensor the light changes from green to yellow to red and ultimately the buzzer goes on when I am too close to the sensor. In my case I have installed the buzzer next to the Arduino however I will recommend you to install the buzzer along with the LEDs. If you want you can also flash the red LED when the buzzer goes on. So now, my partner can park the car easily without making any assumptions. Doesn't matter how many times she fail her driving test she is not going to break my wall (even when she is drunk). Not that I am asking her to drive when she is drunk (just kidding). Thanks again for watching this video! I hope it helps you. If you want to support me, you can subscribe to my channel and watch my other videos. Thanks, ca again in my next video.
  15. 1 point
    crazybuoy

    High volt power supply

    solved, thanks
  16. 1 point
    Tintin

    0-30 Vdc Stabilized Power Supply

    Hi, as promised I made an English translation of my working. Maybe there is few mistakes and I am sorry for that ! Good reading. ExplicationEN.pdf
  17. 1 point
    Impressive. It is not easy to charge the 150ah battery with solar panel directly. For proper charging using solar panel you just need to use a solar charge controller. You must also place the batteries in parallel connection for fast charge. Using solar charge controller avoid reverse current flow from Battery to a solar panel and unharmed pannels from burning. For proper charging your solar panel must create power more than 150w 150w is the threshold point for your charging. More the power added ……charging rate improve.
  18. 1 point
    Hi Everyone, In this tutorial I am going to show you how to charge a Lithium 18650 Cell using TP4056 chip utilizing the solar energy or simply the SUN. Wouldn’t it be really cool if you can charge your mobile phones battery using the sun instead of a USB charger. You can also use this project as a DIY portable power bank. The total cost of this project excluding the battery is just under $5. The battery will addup another $4 to $5 bucks. So the total cost of the project is some what around $10. All components are available on my website for sale for really good price, the link is in the description below. Step 1: Hardware Requirement For this project we need: - A 5v Solar Cell (make sure it is 5v and not anything less than that) - A general purpose circuit board - A 1N4007 High Voltage, High Current Rated Diode (for reverse voltage protection). This diode is rated at forward current of 1A with peak reverse voltage rating of 1000V. - Copper Wire - 2x PCB Screw Terminal Blocks - A 18650 Battery Holder - A 3.7V 18650 Battery - A TP4056 battery protection board (with or without the protection IC) - A 5 V power booster - Some connecting cables - and general soldering equipments Step 2: How the TP4056 Work Looking at this board we can see that it has the TP4056 chip along with few other components of our interest. There are two LEDs on board one red and one blue. The red one comes on when it is charging and the blue one comes on when the charging is done. Then there is this mini USB connector to charge the battery from an external USB charger. There are also these two points where you can solder your own charging unit. These points are marked as IN- and IN+ We will be utilizing these two point to power this board. The battery will be connected to these two point marked as BAT+ and BAT- (pretty mush self explanatory) The board requires an input voltage of 4.5 to 5.5v to charge the battery There are two versions of this board available in the market. One with battery discharge protection module and one without it. Both boards offer 1A charging current and then cut off when finished. Furthermore, the one with protection switches the load off when the battery voltage drops below 2.4V to protect the cell from running at too low (such as on a cloudy day) - and also protects against over-voltage and reverse polarity connection (it will usually destroy itself instead of the battery) however please check you have it connected correctly the first time. Step 3: Copper Legs These boards gets really hot so I will be soldering them a bit above the circuit board. To achieve this I am going to use a hard copper wire to make legs of the circuit board. I will then be sliding the unit on the legs and will solder them all together. I will put 4 copper wires to make 4 legs of this circuit board. You can also use - Male Breakable Pin Headers instead of the copper wire to achieve this. Step 4: Assembly The assembly is very simple. The solar cell is connected to the TP4056 battery charging board's IN+ and IN- respectively. A diode is inserted at the positive end for the reverse voltage protection. Then the BAT+ and BAT- of the board is connected to the +ve and -ve ends of the battery. (That all we need for charging the battery). Now to power an Arduino board we need to boost up the output to 5v. So, we are adding a 5v voltage booster to this circuit. Connect the -ve end of the battery to the IN- of the booster and +ve to IN+ by adding a switch in between. OK, now lets have a look at what I have made. - I have connected the booster board straight to the charger however I will recommend putting a SPDT switch there. So when the device is charging the battery its only charging and not getting used Solar cells are connected to the input of the lithium battery charger (TP4056), whose output is connected to the 18560 lithium battery. A 5V step-up voltage booster is also connected to the battery and is used to convert from 3.7V dc to 5V dc. Charging voltage is typically around 4.2V. Voltage booster's input ranges from 0.9 to 5.0V. So it will see around 3.7V at it's input when the battery is discharging, and 4.2V when it's recharging. The output of the booster to the rest of the circuit will keep it's 5V value. Step 5: Testing This project will be very helpful to power a remote data logger. As we know, the power supply is always a problem for a remote logger and most of the times there is no power outlet available. A situation like that forces you to use some batteries to power your circuit. But eventually, the battery will die. Question is do you want to go there and charge the battery? Our inexpensive solar charger project will be an excellent solution for a situation like this to power an Arduino board. This project can also solve the efficiency issue of Arduino when in sleep. Sleep saves battery, however, the sensors and power regulators (7805) will still consume battery in idle mode draining the battery. By charging the battery as we use it, we can solve our problem. Thanks again for watching this video! I hope it helps you. If you want to support me, you can subscribe to my channel and watch my other videos. Thanks, ca again in my next video. TP4056.pdf
  19. 1 point
    Thanks for sharing this project. I just edited it a bit, so code would look better.
  20. 1 point
    Thanks for the resources!!! I am currently working on the project "Electronic circuits of information collection and processing systems". The topic is very interesting, since I need to investigate the development of the linearizer of the first sensor with smooth and piecewise-linear approximation. It is also necessary to determine the value of the DC component extraction device from the signal of the second sensor. In addition to your recommended resources, I also used the writingcheap.com service, which helped me with the theoretical part of my work of developing an analog-to-digital converter. Using the information of this site http://www.analog.com/en/products/analog-to-digital-converters.html I was able to summarize the results of my research. You have an extremely helpful channel for students on YouTube. You have an extremely helpful channel for students on YouTube.
  21. 1 point
    audioguru

    0-30 Vdc Stabilized Power Supply

    Since it was years ago I do not remember which page of which thread has version 6 or 7. I have the schematic and parts list of version 6 here:
  22. 1 point
    Adam17

    Regarding Cheapest PCB PRICE Inquiry

    I ordered a set of PCB on https://www.jlcpcb.com for a short run production build。 The quality of both the boards and the stencil are great. just cost me 2$.
  23. 1 point
    Dmitry

    MS.NET on ARM devices

    Some developers really need MS .NET Framework for some reason on their ARM devices (mainly on Raspberry Pi). So, basing on their requests, I have made a short tutorial on how to setup .NET on Raspberry Pi.
  24. 1 point
    HarryA

    Transformer Watts

    I enlarged the image off the Amazon.com but could not read it https://www.amazon.com/Black-Decker-LCS1620-Lithium-battery/dp/B01M6TQPY2/ref=sr_1_3/141-0275392-4037060?ie=UTF8&qid=1499813460&sr=8-3&keywords=Black+%26+Decker+LCS1620 ...but ebay.com has a readable image http://www.ebay.com/itm/Black-Decker-LCS1620-20v-20-Volt-Lithum-Ion-Battery-Charger-NEW-/272090041874?epid=1640405275&hash=item3f59d48e12:g:mf8AAOSwawpXr3eh 120v @60hz 300ma
  25. 1 point
    Soldertraining

    clipping circuit

    The clipping circuit does not have energy storage elements like capacitors but it includes both resistors and transistors. This circuit is normally used for the selection in the transmission purpose. The ability of diodes to allow the flow of current in only one direction. A diode is best tested by measuring the voltage drop across the diode when it is forward-biased. A forward-biased diode acts as a closed switch, permitting current to flow. No voltage exists at the diode but voltage may be present in the circuit due to charged capacitors.
  26. 1 point
    Howie

    PCB manufacturing sites - work in progress

    WellPCB http://www.wellpcb.com WELLPCB is focusing on online prototypes orders, to meet the requirement of Low cost, Fast delivery, Easy order for customers around the world.
  27. 1 point
    You ask for a lot! Start with Ebay.com for transmitters and receivers: see: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Mini-88-108MHz-FM-Transmitter-Module-Wireless-Microphone-Dictagraph-Interceptor/141659602950?_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D40832%26meid%3D5caec1e4bbe74e2fa065b6379434198a%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D2%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D111649741072
  28. 1 point
    Externet

    how to make a mailbox light? guys

    Drill a hole on top of the mailbox and insert a ----> Without its pole. Optional, add a door switch for the LED. Done fast for $1. Some silicone sealant may help.
  29. 1 point
    stuee

    12v lamp Dimmer lamp ideas?

    I have a 12v transformer for interior lights and a few lights for it, but want to make it a dimmer light. the working amps are 250mA. I would like to know how to wire up these three ways, so i can try each one and see if its any good and use the best.... Touch lamp. touch the metal to turn on dimmest. press again for brighter and again for brighter and again for off. Manual pot adjuster. and digital potentimeter. press up to turn up and make brighter and down for darker / off, and a reset button to turn instant off. Any help and sche... will be helpfull. Thanks in advance
  30. 1 point
    audioguru

    How to find electronic parts?

    I buy electronic parts from Digikey and Newark because they have offices and warehouses in my country and they stock everything. What can't you find?
  31. 1 point
    jknightandkarr

    Need help with a project

    I am trying to make this KITT's dash compass andi have the leds and using a microcontroller to power them but need help on how to wire them so i use the least amount of conponents possable. I thought of darlington transistor ic's but on the 4 10 led bargraph onesi think both anode n cathode will need darlington transistors. 4 1 for either common cathode or anode and 10 more for the other lead for make the patterns. I might be able to use 1 darlington transistor ic to make the yellow triangle leds work using just 4 i/o pins, but i think i need 14 for the red bargraps whats the best way to wire the bargraph leds up? Thanks. Joe
  32. 1 point
    monkfinger

    0-30V 0-3A Latest Data

    Hi all Ok, this is my end result. Built and tested and works quite well. I started with the version posted at the start of this thread. However I had a couple of problems with the current limiter. I didn't have much success with the current limiter clamping the input of U2 - sometimes it would not go right down to 0V, sometimes it would go just below. Just below was a big problem for me - U2 would start to oscillate, with bad consequences for anything connected to the output of the Q4... It would then drive the output high just when I wanted the current limit to become active I should add that I did not use TL2141 or MC34071s, this might be the root of my problem. I fixed this issue with a small change to circuit layout rather than going to expensive opamps. My mods (compared to the circuit posted on start of this thread): * current limit - I removed D9. To replace this, I added another BC548 - the base is driven by the current flowing through the current limit LED. The collector of this BC548 clamps the output of U2 (exactly like the existing BC548 driven by the negative rail). This arrangement means we don't care how close to its supply voltage the output of U3 can go. It avoids the possibility of driving the input of U2 out of spec. Clamping the output of U2 is much more like how the integrated voltage regulators work. It seems better to my mind, to keep U2 out of the loop when current limit is active. [Edit: note that U2 will need a small heatsink with this arrangement] * some rearrangement of the opamp power connections, for all three opamps... U1 & U3 are run via 15V zener diodes, to give a supply of approx 30V. That allows almost any cheap opamp to be used for U1 & U3 (741s or TL071 etc). U2 is connected to unregulated 44V and to the output side of the 0R47. * I used a MC33171 opamp for U2. It is high voltage, but much cheaper (they are £0.60 in UK) than TL2141 or MC34071 (both are £5 here). It is a low power IC by comparison. * 0-30V 4A transformer. * 2 x 6800uF smoothing caps.a big thanks to the contributors on this thread for their efforts, my project was greatly speeded up by borrowing a lot of their ideas Edit: * I also changed the 0R47 to 0R2, as the 0R47 generated too much heat at 3A for my liking. This also means R18 changes to 330K. These two values are not shown on the schematic here.
  33. 1 point
    admin

    SOFT ROBOTIC FISH

    Maybe you can consider casting soft plastic or silicon, i think this would be ideal.
  34. 1 point
    admin

    SOFT ROBOTIC FISH

    You need to be more specific about your project, so we can help.
  35. 1 point
    audioguru

    Desperate Help Needed

    Thanks for the freelancing job recommendation but I am a 70 years old government worker (I am retired with a government pension and some stocks and bonds) so I do not need more income. I do whatever I want whenever I want.
  36. 1 point
    audioguru

    Desperate Help Needed

    The output of a preamp will produce clipping distortion if the input level is too high. The pickup from an electric guitar produces a level much higher than an FM tuner, a CD player or an MP3 player. Most preamps for a guitar pickup use a Jfet because of its very high input impedance with a gain of only about 1.4 times.
  37. 1 point
    audioguru

    Desperate Help Needed

    Nobody makes an LA4058. You got the numbers mixed up, the schematic shows a Sanyo LA4508. Your 13.6V transformer must feed the rectifiers on the Power Part of the schematic. Maybe you fed the transformer wrongly to the amplifier instead of to the rectifiers? Then probably many parts are destroyed. Your 13.6V transformer will produce a peak of 19.2V and the rectifiers reduce it to +17.2V. With a 17V supply the LA4508 produces about 6W at clipping into 4 ohms per channel. Who told you 100W? It has fairly high distortion at low and high frequencies and it cuts frequencies above only 5kHz. Your amplifier probably uses one LA4508 for left woofer and left tweeter and the second LA4508 is probably used for right woofer and right tweeter.
  38. 1 point
    Guest

    0-30V 0-3A Latest Data

    Continued
  39. 1 point
    Guest

    0-30V 0-3A Latest Data

    Continued
  40. 1 point
    darrins

    PWM using 555 timer

    I read several datasheets and application notes on 555 timers, but I can't seem to find the information I'm looking for. Specifically, I'd like to use the 555 as a pulse width modulator by using the control voltage (pin 5). The datasheets indicate that in monostable mode, the output pulse width can be varied by modulating the voltage at pin 5 (V5). They also indicate that in astable mode, modulating V5 will modulate pulse position. What I'm wondering is this: What is the relationship between the control voltage, V5, and the values of the timing resistors and caps? There are standard formulas for timing based on these resistors and caps. How are those formulas affected by the introduction of V5? Thanks. Darrin
  41. 1 point
    I've done a lot of electronic components Online trading platform. Here are some of the sites that I use frequently. Avoid Radio Shack at all costs unless absolutely necessary,these platform supply ic parts,I hope can help everyone., Digikey Electronics http://www.digikey.com Allied Electronics http://www.alliedelec.com Jameco Electronics http://www.jameco.com Mouser Electronics http://www.mouser.com Newark Electronics http://www.newark.com PI Manufacturing http://www.pimfg.com Relay Specialties http://www.relayspec.com Automation Direct http://www.automationdirect.com Robot Marketplace http://www.robotmarketplace.com Grainger Industrial Supply http://www.grainger.com Markertek Electronics http://www.markertek.com BTX Technologies http://www.btx.com Local stores in Rochester, NY, USA Goldcrest Electronics http://www.goldcrestelectronics.com Glenwood Sales and Surplus http://glenwoodsales.com/ Simcona Electronics http://www.simcona.com
  42. 1 point
    hotwaterwizard

    BTY79 and C106D Thyristor.

    BTY79 NTE Replacement BTY79-800R = NTE5531 BTY79-600R = NTE5529 BTY79-500R = NTE5529 BTY79-400R = NTE5527 NTE Datasheet http://www.nteinc.com/specs/5500to5599/pdf/nte5520_31.pdf C106D = NTE5457 NTE Datasheet http://www.nteinc.com/specs/5400to5499/pdf/nte5452_58.pdf Try these suppliers Digikey --- http://www.Digikey.com Mouser --- http://www.Mouser.com Newark --- http://www.newark.com MCM Electronics --- http://www.mcmelectronics.com
  43. 1 point
    grsparks

    An excellent electronics manual

    After running across this at the public library in town, I just had to order my own copy: "Practical Electronics for Inventors" by Paul Scherz It covers just about everything from DC to Microcontrollers and is well illustrated.
  44. 1 point
    >:( Thats rubbish to delete these I have come to this site only for these great books Please get them back ::)
  45. 1 point
    I am very sad too :-[ [move] :'( :-[ :-\ :'( :-[[/move] No doubt, ER has been the one of most attractive features of the site. All the thanks and respect goes to Mr. Ante for such a good contribution to this part of site. I now request MIXOS to leave the contents as it is not reasonable to throw away ones friends(books).
  46. 1 point
    audioguru

    FM Micromitter only transmitting 8M

    Pin 8 of the IC should be 5.0V which is the output of the 78L05 voltage regulator or the 6V battery voltage. If you use the voltage regulator and D1 in series with it, then the minimum input voltage is 8.2V. Don't use a 9V battery because its voltage quickly falls lower. The micromitter has an attenuator of 3 resistors at its output to reduce its range. Remove the attenuator for much greater range.
  47. 1 point
    Here is all I have Playstation2_Repairguide.pdf
  48. 1 point
    audioguru

    0-30 Vdc Stabilized Power Supply

    Hi Gruber, The current-setting pot in this project has a tolerance of 20% and the values of the resistors were chosen so it provides 3A if the pot's resistance is 20% high. If your pot's resistance is 20% low then with it set to max, the project will try to produce 4.2A. Such a high current will overload the transformer and cause its core to saturate. A transformer with a saturated core isn't a transformer anymore, it is a piece of wire across the mains, blowing fuses. You should add a trimpot in series with the current-setting pot. Adjust the trimpot so the project supplies a max of exactly 3A when the current-setting pot is at max.
  49. 1 point
    ante

    PWM using 555 timer

    Darrin, Can this help you? Ante ::)
  50. 1 point
    MP

    0-30 Vdc Stabilized Power Supply

    Think of the commas as periods or the periods as commas. These are used differently in different continents. It means the same. MP