Sign in to follow this  
mixos

Cold Heat Soldering Tool

Recommended Posts

Heats fast, cools fast
The Cold Heat Soldering Tool is a cordless tool that heats quickly and cools down nearly as fast. It creates the heat right in the proprietary tip material, making the tool 20 times more efficient than the average conventional soldering iron. The tip reaches 500 F in less than 1 second for many types of joints and cools to the touch in 1-5 seconds so you can put it away

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been trying out this device to see what comments I could add about it. I only have the larger tip, so I cannot get into the tight spots with mine, but it looks like the tip touching the solder or copper completes a connection and causes the tip to get hot like a little welder. Then when you remove it, the connection is lost and it immediately shuts down and cools off. With a little practice, I think I could do pretty good on larger circuits. My only concerns are that I see a little spark when the tip is making connection. I am not so sure you would be able to use such a tool with static sensitive devices. Suraj, perhaps the spark will help keep you awake ;D

MP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now that you are mentioning the sparks, i have a story to tell ;). Some years ago in a magazine named Electronics For You (in India) i read an article. It was about making a solder gun from a normal wooden pencil. The recipe was like this. You will need a 12V/1A DC power supply (filtering is not required). Take a wooden pencil attach one terminal of the power supply to one end of the pencil (to the lead inside it). And attach other terminal of power supply to the solder metal. Now trim the other end of the pencil to suit your needs. When you connect that end to the solder metal, it melts. I tried it out it was working fine until i accidently burned one BC547 by touchin base wth one lead & collector with another ;D . I stopped using it at last when i fried some more parts ;D So if it sparks take care

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeh!..I like my Weller too..One thing to know though..Some brands of resin core solder are not 60/40..they are 50/50 in make-up [tin/lead]... this leads to more heat required and sometimes ruined PCBs [ watch the cost of tin on the stock market ]...Dicky

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone got a hunch on how it works? I'm guessing it uses some sort of ultra-sonic magnetic field which creates a vibration in the solder which induces friction and heat. Kind of like a pin-pointed microwave.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is my hunch:
It is more like a short circuit. There is a split in the tip and when you have a connection by the copper across the split, I think you are completing this connection which causes a short and thus gives you a high current. There is a spark like when you have a short.
I have only used mine a few times to see how it functions, but I imagine that the AAA batteries will not have a very long life if you use it a lot.

MP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Here is my hunch:
It is more like a short circuit. There is a split in the tip and when you have a connection by the copper across the split, I think you are completing this connection which causes a short and thus gives you a high current. There is a spark like when you have a short.
I have only used mine a few times to see how it functions, but I imagine that the AAA batteries will not have a very long life if you use it a lot.

MP

yep thats how it works not a pinpointed microwave short circuit

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is not a welder, the tip is a low value resistor with two contacts. Bridge the contacts with something conductive and the tip heats.
If it has enough voltage to light an LED and it has enough current to get hot, then it will light-up the base-emitter or base-collector junction of a transistor too. ;D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have one and ya it looks pretty. I don't use it because it sucks up battires fast. and you really got to fanagel around with it to get it to solder. Its like a test to see if its going to work this time or not. Like I said I got one, its on my bench or shelf someware and it sure looks pretty. Good thing  I got a weller too ;D
                                                    have fun
                                                        gogo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi logan
You mean something like this
http://www.web-tronics.com/esdsacpucore.html
  I don't have one of these yet. But it would be nice to have.

You don't want the cold soldering Tool I got, I broke one tip trying to make it work and the other on is the big one. It take 4 aa battires to get it to work and you might get 5 good solder joints out of it befor you have change batteries.
                                gogo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ok i got this thing as a gift its pretty cool!
but downside...

its finiky...

you have to touch the tip just right

also you dont tin the thing...weird...

it seems sort of bogus 2 me

my theory of operation:

i thinks its a dc-dc converer

like the ones found powering the light in your scanner...

a astable multiviborator clock goes through a stepup transformer

but with some sort of regulator for the thing so it dosent arc or put a hole thru your finger

i have cut pcbs by using the arc from a scanners dc-dc converter

and put holes thru the tips of my fingers... also melted solder and lit a cigarette


i cant do anzthing with it its weird

by the way it takes 4 AA batteries and they heat up terriblely

my opinion... it makes a better flashlight then it does a soldering iron...


i took a look inside...

1 little surface mount board... the main chipis a ....

I don't know! you tell me!

they grinded the ic # off!!!

they really must not want this piece of junk copied!

it could have been worse

i might have had to pay for it... nope i got it as a gift...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there a patent # for the device? If so, the documents at the patent office should clarify what's up. Or is it not fair to go to the answer book?

How does one go about looking through patents? Is there a URL link that you know? I know that it is public knowledge and that you could go to the patent office to look through items by category, but I have not seen an internet link. Was just wondering if anyone knew.

MP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I am aware many things do not carry a patent. Thanks for the link.

Mac L: Thanks for bringing up the subject of patents. "Patents in general" might be an interesting discussion for a new topic.

MP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few things to note. I have owned one of these and returned it days later. It does work but it is very touchy. You have to get the tip just right on the joint for it to heat up and most the time you do have to put some pressure on it. The problem is the instruction book specifically says do not press down on the tip or you'll break it. I sucks batteries way to fast. This device is only good to keep in a glove box for and emergency solder needs, that way the batteries have a chance to recover a bit from it's last use. The thing doesn't heat and cool as fast as it says. It heats up in a short time (20secs) but the longer it's on the longer it takes to cool. It normally takes awhile to heat up so by the time you soldered your joint the thing is to hot to touch for the next minute ..... not seconds. I have looked over the patent and the patent covers the idea and tip not the circuit that drives it, it might be under another patent. The thing does put off sparks when you first touch a solder joint. Melting an already existing solder joint is a lot easier then making a new one. When trying to make a new joint if you start the tool on the solder pad you will turn the pad red hot and melt it off the board, if you start it on the solder then when it starts to melt you lose the connection between the tips and it stops heating. If you get clumsy with the tip and it touches two pads at once you will send a bad amount of current through your circuit. My suggestion. Save your money.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this