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IC doesn't fit in pcb

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I have an integrated circuit that doesn't fit in my pcb board that I bought. Will I break the IC if I bend the terminals? What are my options? Do I need to scrap the entire board since it won't accommodate my project?

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I have an integrated circuit that doesn't fit in my pcb board that I bought. Will I break the IC if I bend the terminals? What are my options? Do I need to scrap the entire board since it won't accommodate my project?

Not enough details.
Is the IC too big or is it too small to fit on the pcb?
What is the IC? Is it an audio amplifier with two rows of terminals?

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Not enough details.
Is the IC too big or is it too small to fit on the pcb?
What is the IC? Is it an audio amplifier with two rows of terminals?


It is too small. It is a TDA7297 chip. I'm trying to fit it into a general pcb that would probably fit into a bread board. It doed have two rows. it stands upright as apposed to laying against on the board.

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Guest liquibyte

I just looked up the chip in question and think what he's trying to do is put a multiwatt 15 into a breadboard.  Yes, you can bend the pins a bit to make them fit on something like a perfboard but you more than likely won't get them to fit into a breadboard without bending the pins in an extreme fashion.  Not that you can't do that if you do it carefully, but you will be sacrificing the ability to reuse them on a real pcb because you won't be able to put them back to their original position later.  My suggestion to use them in a breadboard circuit is get some 22 awg wire and solder on an inch or two to each leg and run the wires to the breadboard.  It's a pain, but it will work for the most part.

As for the volume pot... What?  Seriously, we'd need to see a schematic of what you're trying to accomplish and for the most part, if you have that it'll show you where to hook it up.  I think you've delved into electronics without knowing some of the mechanics of it.  There's a ton of things you certainly can't plug into a breadboard directly for instance.  There are some components you just can't get in through hole packages for better or worse.  Using the trick above, however, you can get them usable without any investment in breakout boards and the like.

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I thought he was using strip board but there's no way of knowing for sure without a photograph.

As far as the potentiometer is concerned: you may have to solder wires to it but keep them short and they may have to be screened, if it's carrying a small signal.

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I attached a schematic. I have looked at other schematics for amplifiers and it has shown the volume being ether on the input or on the main power input. Since the chip has two input pins I don't know how well it would work. I could put the pot in the main power input but my pot is only rated for about half a watt. I didn't see the volume in the schematic. Also I am in the process of trying to print my own circuit board but the pins are a little weird so who knows if I will get that to work out or not. I'm using a program called freepcb.

post-62473-14279144729704_thumb.png

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The potentiometer shouldn't be connected to the main power input.

The volume control is nearly always connected to the signal input. A potentiometer varies the amplitude of the signal going in by acting as a variable potential divider. Since your circuit has two inputs, you need to have a dual ganged potentiometer.

Another thing to look out for is that the potentiometer needs to have a logarithmic track to match the response of the human ear. Here's an example:
http://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/potentiometers/7293451/

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It is too small. It is a TDA7297 chip. I'm trying to fit it into a general pcb that would probably fit into a bread board. It doed have two rows. it stands upright as apposed to laying against on the board.

TDA7297 chip is too small which can not fit on pcb. If you can't then you need to fit it on the suitable pcb. you can find components and information for smt stencils and solder paste stencils from soldertools.net  

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Of course the TDA7297 is not too small to fit on a PCB. Any IC can be mounted on a PCB, no matter how small.

I think what he's saying is it's not the right shape to fit on a breadboard or stripboard. For a start don't even consider trying with breadboard, which isn't suitable as the current is too high. As for a stripboard: the pins can easily be bent so it'll fit and assemble it as neatly and as compactly as possible.

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